No Gods and Precious Few Heroes

westdrumlins

random reblogs of Urbanism and politics...

letsbuildahome-fr:

architecture pictures to follow soon this week, i promise.
in the meantime, a map of l.a that shows, pretty clearly, the gigantic-ness (which is a real word, according to me) of los angeles.
http://archinect.com/news/article/18228916/comparison-of-other-major-cities-that-can-fit-inside-la
it perhaps helps to understand l.a in terms of it’s sprawl and it’s size. in some ways l.a would make more sense to the world (and, well, to me) if it were considered more of a county, containing about 100 or 200 smaller cities and towns, than a city proper. but as a city proper it’s fascinating and baffling and odd and utopian and dystopian all in equal measure. which is a big part of why i live here.
moby

letsbuildahome-fr:

architecture pictures to follow soon this week, i promise.

in the meantime, a map of l.a that shows, pretty clearly, the gigantic-ness (which is a real word, according to me) of los angeles.

http://archinect.com/news/article/18228916/comparison-of-other-major-cities-that-can-fit-inside-la

it perhaps helps to understand l.a in terms of it’s sprawl and it’s size. in some ways l.a would make more sense to the world (and, well, to me) if it were considered more of a county, containing about 100 or 200 smaller cities and towns, than a city proper. but as a city proper it’s fascinating and baffling and odd and utopian and dystopian all in equal measure. which is a big part of why i live here.

moby

(via the-gasoline-station)

furtho:

Houses for the workers at the Bata shoe factory at Zlin, Czechoslovakia (via FIELD GREY)

furtho:

Houses for the workers at the Bata shoe factory at Zlin, Czechoslovakia (via FIELD GREY)

(via architectureofdoom)

architectureofdoom:

Budapest, 1969

architectureofdoom:

Budapest, 1969

architectureofdoom:

HLM housing in Cité d’Orgemont, Épinay-sur-Seine (Paris suburb)

architectureofdoom:

HLM housing in Cité d’Orgemont, Épinay-sur-Seine (Paris suburb)

onsomething:

onsomething

Pueblo Bonito |  AD 828 and 1126 New Mexico

onsomething:

onsomething

Pueblo Bonito |  AD 828 and 1126 New Mexico

(Source: jqjacobs.net, via architectureofdoom)

letsbuildahome-fr:

A workman mows the grass roof of a government building near the capital city of Tórshavn, on August 13, 2009. © Bob Strong/Reuters

letsbuildahome-fr:

A workman mows the grass roof of a government building near the capital city of Tórshavn, on August 13, 2009. © Bob Strong/Reuters

(via the-gasoline-station)

architectureofdoom:

Brasilia
thisbigcity:

Paris’ cycle hire scheme won an award at the FT/Citi Ingenuity Awards last year, and now the awards scheme is back. Can you think of a great idea to nominate? There’s more info on the process in our latest post. 

thisbigcity:

Paris’ cycle hire scheme won an award at the FT/Citi Ingenuity Awards last year, and now the awards scheme is back. Can you think of a great idea to nominate? There’s more info on the process in our latest post

fotojournalismus:

Poor in cages show dark side of Hong Kong boom
For many of the richest people in Hong Kong, one of Asia’s wealthiest cities, home is a mansion with an expansive view from the heights of Victoria Peak. For some of the poorest, like Leung Cho-yin, home is a metal cage.
The 67-year-old former butcher pays 1,300 Hong Kong dollars ($167) a month for one of about a dozen wire mesh cages resembling rabbit hutches crammed into a dilapidated apartment in a gritty, working-class West Kowloon neighbourhood.
While cage homes, which sprang up in the 1950s to cater mostly to single men coming in from mainland China, are becoming rarer, other types of substandard housing such as cubicle apartments are growing as more families are pushed into poverty. Nearly 1.19 million people were living in poverty in the first half of last year, up from 1.15 million in 2011, according to the Hong Kong Council Of Social Services. There’s no official poverty line but it’s generally defined as half of the city’s median income of HK$12,000 ($1,550) a month.
Many poor residents have applied for public housing but face years of waiting. Nearly three-quarters of 500 low-income families questioned by Oxfam Hong Kong in a recent survey had been on the list for more than 4 years without being offered a flat. [Read More]
Photos : 62-year-old Cheng Man Wai lies in the 16 square foot cage that he calls home, 63-year-old Lee Tat-fong walks in a corridor while her two grandchildren — Amy, 9, and Steven, 13 — sit in their 50-square-foot room, 77-year-old Yeung Ying Biu eats next to his cage and Yeung Ying Biu sits inside his cage home on Jan. 25, 2013 in Hong Kong.
[Credit : Vincent Yu/AP]

fotojournalismus:

Poor in cages show dark side of Hong Kong boom

For many of the richest people in Hong Kong, one of Asia’s wealthiest cities, home is a mansion with an expansive view from the heights of Victoria Peak. For some of the poorest, like Leung Cho-yin, home is a metal cage.

The 67-year-old former butcher pays 1,300 Hong Kong dollars ($167) a month for one of about a dozen wire mesh cages resembling rabbit hutches crammed into a dilapidated apartment in a gritty, working-class West Kowloon neighbourhood.

While cage homes, which sprang up in the 1950s to cater mostly to single men coming in from mainland China, are becoming rarer, other types of substandard housing such as cubicle apartments are growing as more families are pushed into poverty. Nearly 1.19 million people were living in poverty in the first half of last year, up from 1.15 million in 2011, according to the Hong Kong Council Of Social Services. There’s no official poverty line but it’s generally defined as half of the city’s median income of HK$12,000 ($1,550) a month.

Many poor residents have applied for public housing but face years of waiting. Nearly three-quarters of 500 low-income families questioned by Oxfam Hong Kong in a recent survey had been on the list for more than 4 years without being offered a flat. [Read More]

Photos : 62-year-old Cheng Man Wai lies in the 16 square foot cage that he calls home, 63-year-old Lee Tat-fong walks in a corridor while her two grandchildren — Amy, 9, and Steven, 13 — sit in their 50-square-foot room, 77-year-old Yeung Ying Biu eats next to his cage and Yeung Ying Biu sits inside his cage home on Jan. 25, 2013 in Hong Kong.

[Credit : Vincent Yu/AP]

(via architectureofdoom)